Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Level:
Community College / Lower Division
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Tags:
Oss0212, Sociology
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Text/HTML

Describe the relationship between key components of social location such as gender, social class, and race and ethnicity, and health outcomes

Module Overview

OER Text Materials

Sociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Section: 18.3

Section 3 outlines the impact of social class, race and gender on health. This section is a social epidemiological view of health and illness. The section on gender and health does a nice job discussing the impact of masculinity on health. The section concludes with a discussion of mental illness and focuses on gender differences in mental illness.

Section 1: Supplementary Material (Videos and Reading)

  1. Health and Healthcare Disparities in the U.S. – Khan Academy (video)
    Provides an overview of healthcare inequality.
     
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Office of Minority Health
    The Office of Minority Health provides a lot of great data on specific minority populations in the U.S. Instructors might fine especially useful the minority population profiles, which give demographic and health outcome data.
     
  3. Reducing Racial And Social-Class Inequalities In Health: The Need For A New Approach
    This is an approachable article on reducing racial and social class inequalities in health. The article argues that there is a need to focus on fundamental causes of health and illness and does a nice job illustrating this idea with clear example. These examples could foster good class discussion.

Section 2: Data

Infant Mortality Reports – Columbus Public Health
This site provides several briefs on infant mortality in Franklin county. One brief, “Infant Mortality Trends” provides table and graphs with trends for the past 10 years by race and ethnicity. The data provides a shocking picture of racial health disparities.