Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Level:
Community College / Lower Division, College / Upper Division
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Tags:
  • Cause & Effect
  • Classification
  • Comparison & Contrast
  • Definition
  • Description
  • Illustration
  • Narration
  • Persuasion
  • Process Analysis
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, eBook, Interactive, Text/HTML, Video

    Education Standards

    Genres: Course Map & Recommended Resources

    Overview

    How to Use This Guide

    This document is intended to highlight resources that can be used to address the topic of Genres that might be assigned in a First- and/or Second-Year Writing Course. All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded to a Course Management System via hyperlink.

    Introduction

    This portion of the course is simply to provide explanation, examples, and samples of Genres or Rhetorical Modes of writing students might be assigned in First- and Second-Year Writing courses. This module assumes that instructors will utilize other learning objectives (e.g. Writing as a Process, Collaboration, Grammar and Style, Critical Thinking, Conducting Research, and Understanding Rhetorical Situations, etc.) to teach writing, using this section merely as illustrations of academic genres or rhetorical modes.  

    Recommended Resources

    In first-year writing, emphasis might be placed on getting students to be more critical thinkers, readers, and writers; to recognize the elements that inform rhetorical situations; to understand the importance of the writing process; and to practice the composing of formal written work in response to many sources. Second-year writing builds on the lessons learned in first-year writing, while possibly adding deeper analysis and critique through the development of arguments supported by evidence found during formal research. Given that many colleges/universities only require their students to take first-year writing, some instructors have chosen to introduce learning objectives from second-year writing to their students earlier. This overlap between the two means that a variety of genres can be taught in either course. Below are some possibilities. In no way is this list complete, but it does provide common writing assignment descriptions and examples/samples.

    Successful Writing

    This resource is available as a PDF.

    • Cause and Effect

    • Classification

    • Comparison and Contrast

    • Definition

    • Description

    • Illustration

    • Narration

    • Persuasion

    • Process Analysis

    • Research

    Writing for Success

    This is adapted from a work produced by a publisher who has requested that the original author not receive attribution. This adapted edition is produced by the University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing through the eLearning Support Initiative.

    Writing Unleashed by Sybil Priebe, Dana Anderson, and Ronda Marman

    This resource is available as a PDF and published by North Dakota State College of Science.

    • Argument

    • Cause and Effect

    • Compare and Contrast

    • Definition

    • Description

    • Division and Classification

    • Email

    • Essays

    • Illustration

    • Letters

    • Memoirs

    • Narration

    • Profiles

    • Process Analysis

    • Research

    Purdue Online Writing Lab

    Most students are familiar with this site due to its extensive use among English instructors.

    The Process of Research Writing by Steven Krause

    This resource has Creative Commons Attribution, Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0.