Proteins

Section Summary

Proteins are a class of macromolecules that perform a diverse range of functions for the cell. They help in metabolism by acting as enzymes, carriers, or hormones, and provide structural support. The building blocks of proteins (monomers) are amino acids. Each amino acid has a central carbon that bonds to an amino group, a carboxyl group, a hydrogen atom, and an R group or side chain. There are 20 commonly occurring amino acids, each of which differs in the R group. A peptide bond links each amino acid to its neighbors. A long amino acid chain is a polypeptide.

Proteins are organized at four levels: primary, secondary, tertiary, and (optional) quaternary. The primary structure is the amino acids' unique sequence. The polypeptide's local folding to form structures such as the α-helix and β-pleated sheet constitutes the secondary structure. The overall three-dimensional structure is the tertiary structure. When two or more polypeptides combine to form the complete protein structure, the configuration is the protein's quaternary structure. Protein shape and function are intricately linked. Any change in shape caused by changes in temperature or pH may lead to protein denaturation and a loss in function.