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Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies: Teaching and Assessing Writing for a Socially Just Future
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In Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies, Asao B. Inoue theorizes classroom writing assessment as a complex system that is "more than" its interconnected elements. To explain how and why antiracist work in the writing classroom is vital to literacy learning, Inoue incorporates ideas about the white racial habitus that informs dominant discourses in the academy and other contexts. Inoue helps teachers understand the unintended racism that often occurs when teachers do not have explicit antiracist agendas in their assessments. Drawing on his own teaching and classroom inquiry, Inoue offers a heuristic for developing and critiquing writing assessment ecologies that explores seven elements of any writing assessment ecology: power, parts, purposes, people, processes, products, and places.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
WAC Clearinghouse
Author:
Asao B. Inoue
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Bad Ideas About Writing
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Bad Ideas About Writing counters major myths about writing instruction. Inspired by the provocative science- and social-science-focused book This Idea Must Die and written for a general audience, the collection offers opinionated, research-based statements intended to spark debate and to offer a better way of teaching writing. Contributors, as scholars of rhetoric and composition, provide a snapshot of and antidotes to major myths in writing instruction. This collection is published in whole by the Digital Publishing Institute at WVU Libraries and in part by Inside Higher Ed.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
West Virginia University
Provider Set:
Open Access Textbooks
Author:
Cheryl E. Ball
Drew M. Loewe
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Beyond Argument: Essaying as a Practice of (Ex)Change
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Beyond Argument offers an in-depth examination of how current ways of thinking about the writer-page relation in personal essays can be reconceived according to practices in the care of the self — an ethic by which writers such as Seneca, Montaigne, and Nietzsche lived. This approach promises to reinvigorate the form and address many of the concerns expressed by essay scholars and writers regarding the lack of rigorous exploration we see in our students' personal essays — and sometimes, even, in our own. In pursuing this approach, Sarah Allen presents a version of subjectivity that enables productive debate in the essay, among essays, and beyond.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
WAC Clearinghouse
Author:
Sarah Allen
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Beyond Dichotomy: Synergizing Writing Center and Classroom Pedagogies
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How closely can or should writing centers and writing classrooms collaborate? Beyond Dichotomy explores how research on peer tutoring one-to-one and in small groups can inform our work with students in writing centers and other tutoring programs, as well as in writing courses and classrooms. These multi-method (including rhetorical and discourse analyses and ethnographic and case-study) investigations center on several course-based tutoring (CBT) partnerships at two universities. Rather than practice separately in the center or in the classroom, rather than seeing teacher here and tutor there and student over there, CBT asks all participants in the dynamic drama of teaching and learning to consider the many possible means of connecting synergistically.

This book offers the "more-is-more" value of designing more peer-to-peer learning situations for developmental and multicultural writers, and a more elaborate view of what happens in these peer-centered learning environments. It offers important implications—especially of directive and nondirective tutoring strategies and methods—for peer-to-peer learning and one-to-one tutoring and conferencing for all teachers and learners of writing.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
WAC Clearinghouse
Author:
Steven J. Corbett
Date Added:
01/01/2015
The Centrality of Style
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In The Centrality of Style, editors Mike Duncan and Star Medzerian Vanguri argue that style is a central concern of composition studies even as they demonstrate that some of the most compelling work in the area has emerged from the margins of the field. Calling attention to this paradox in his foreword to the collection, Paul Butler observes, "Many of the chapters work within the liminal space in which style serves as both a centralizing and decentralizing force in rhetoric and composition. Clearly, the authors and editors have made an invaluable contribution in their collection by exposing the paradoxical nature of a canon that continues to play a vital role in our disciplinary history."

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
WAC Clearinghouse
Author:
Mike Duncan
Star Medzerian Vanguri
Date Added:
02/17/2013
Composition Reading Bank
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Composition Reading Bank is a repository of links to freely available texts that replaces a traditional reader for Composition courses.

This Reading Bank is meant to be an ongoing collaborative project; users should contact Nick Lakostik at nlakosti@cscc.edu if they have ideas for freely accessible texts that would be good additions to the Reading Bank. A summary of what the text is about and how it is or could be useful in your Composition course would also be appreciated. Please also send information about broken links to the same email address.

A link to this resource on the Columbus State Community College Library's web page is:

https://library.cscc.edu/compreadingbank

Except where otherwise indicated, the Composition Reading Bank by Rachel Brooks-Pannell, Shawn Casey, Rebecca Fleming, and Nick Lakostik at Columbus State Community College is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. This license does not extend to the contents of external web pages.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Columbus State Community College
Author:
Columbus State Community College
Nick Lakostik
Rachel Brooks-Pannell
Rebecca Fleming
Shawn Casey
Date Added:
08/05/2019
Copy(write): Intellectual Property in the Writing Classroom
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The editors of Copy(write): Intellectual Property in the Writing Classroom bring together stories, theories, and research that can further inform the ways in which we situate and address intellectual property issues in our writing classrooms. The essays in the collection identify and describe a wide range of pedagogical strategies, consider theories, present research, explore approaches, and offer both cautionary tales and local and contextual successes that can further inform the ways in which we situate and address intellectual property issues in our teaching.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
WAC Clearinghouse
Author:
Danielle Nicole DeVoss
Martine Courant Rife
Shaun Slattery
Date Added:
08/04/2011
Critical Expressivism: Theory and Practice in the Composition Classroom
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Critical Expressivism is an ambitious attempt to re-appropriate intellectual territory that has more often been charted by its detractors than by its proponents. Indeed, as Peter Elbow observes in his contribution to this volume, "As far as I can tell, the term 'expressivist' was coined and used only by people who wanted a word for people they disapproved of and wanted to discredit." The editors and contributors to this collection invite readers to join them in a new conversation, one informed by "a belief that the term expressivism continues to have a vitally important function in our field."

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
WAC Clearinghouse
Author:
Tara Roeder
Date Added:
11/28/2014
Deliberative Rhetoric: Arguing about Doing
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Christian Kock’s essays show the essential interconnectedness of practical reasoning, rhetoric and deliberative democracy. They constitute a unique contribution to argumentation theory that draws on – and criticizes – the work of philosophers, rhetoricians, political scientists and other argumentation theorists. It puts rhetoric in the service of modern democracies by drawing attention to the obligations of politicians to articulate arguments and objections that citizens can weigh against each other in their deliberations about possible courses of action.

Subject:
Philosophy
Composition and Rhetoric
Author:
Christian Kock
Date Added:
02/28/2018
Design Discourse: Composing and Revising Programs in Professional and Technical Writing
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Design Discourse: Composing and Revising Programs in Professional and Technical Writing addresses the complexities of developing professional and technical writing programs. The essays in the collection offer reflections on efforts to bridge two cultures — what the editors characterize as the "art and science of writing" — often by addressing explicitly the tensions between them. Design Discourse offers insights into the high-stakes decisions made by program designers as they seek to "function at the intersection of the practical and the abstract, the human and the technical."

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
WAC Clearinghouse
Author:
Alex Reid
Anthony Di Renzo
David Franke
Date Added:
03/03/2010
EmpoWord: A Student-Centered Anthology & Handbook for College Writers
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EmpoWord is a reader and rhetoric that champions the possibilities of student writing. The textbook uses actual student writing to exemplify effective writing strategies, celebrating dedicated college writing students to encourage and instruct their successors: the students in your class. Through both creative and traditional activities, readers are encouraged to explore a variety of rhetorical situations to become more critical agents of reading, writing, speaking, and listening in all facets of their lives. Straightforward and readable instruction sections introduce key vocabulary, concepts, and strategies. Three culminating assignments (Descriptive Personal Narrative; Text-Wrestling Analysis; Persuasive Research Essay) give students a chance to show their learning while also practicing rhetorical awareness techniques for future writing situations.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Portland State University
Provider Set:
PDXOpen
Author:
Shane Abrams
Date Added:
07/11/2018
English Composition 1
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Composition I focuses on principles of writing, critical reading and essay composition using rhetorical styles common in college-level writing (narrative, example/illustration, compare/contrast, cause-and-effect, argument).

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
01/01/2014
English Composition 2
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Composition 2 is an expository writing course requiring more advanced writing skills than Composition 1, yet reviewing and incorporating some of the same skills. This course teaches research skills by emphasizing the development of advanced analytical/critical reading skills, proficiency in investigative research, and the writing of persuasive prose including documented and researched argumentative essays. A major component of this course will be an emphasis on the research process and information literacy.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
02/28/2018
English Composition I (ENGL 101)
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English 101 focuses on the analysis of basic human issues as presented in literature with an emphasis on analytic reading, writing and discussion, and on development of argumentative essays based on textual analysis, with attention to style, audience and documentation. By writing several analytical, thesis-driven essays which show engagement with and understanding of a variety of texts, students will practice the critical thinking, reading and writing skills which comprise an important component of college and university studies as well as clear, audience-appropriate communications in other professional settings.This class is comprised of a series of three units, each of which is centered around an essay assignment. For each unit, in addition to the essay itself, you‰ŰŞll be asked to respond to reading assignments and to complete exploratory writing assignments. You‰ŰŞll do a lot of reading and writing, and your instructor will ask you to respond to ideas from our texts, from specific assignments, and from each other. Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
Exploring Perspectives: A Concise Guide to Analysis
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The reason why Randall Fallows wrote Exploring Perspectives: A Concise Guide to Analysis is simple; to help give students a better understanding of how to discover, develop, and revise an analytical essay. Here is how his 5 chapter book goes about doing just that:The first two chapters focus on the nature of an analysis and what’s involved in writing an analytical essay. First, Randall shows that analysis consists of a balance of assertions (statements which present their viewpoints or launch an exploration of their concerns), examples (specific passages/scenes/events which inspire these views), explanations (statements that reveal how the examples support the assertions), and significance (statements which reveal the importance of their study to personal and/or cultural issues).After showing why each feature should be present throughout an essay, he reveals how to ”set the stage“ for producing one of their own. He first helps students to evaluate their own views on a subject and to examine how these views emerge from their own experiences, values and judgments. He, then, shows them how to research what others have said about the subject and provides suggestions for evaluating and incorporating this research into their own perspectives.Finally, Randall discusses the nature of writing, not as a linear procedure, but as a recursive process where the discovery and clarification of a concept occur simultaneously.The remaining three chapters reveal more specific advice on how to develop an analytical essay.Exploring Perspectives: A Concise Guide to Analysis by Randall Fallows is a great text to prepare any student to write analytical essays for the argument and persuasion courses.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Flat World Knowledge
Author:
Randall Fallows
Date Added:
01/01/2011
First Year Writing Course Content
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The First Year Writing Course was developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Module and is also named TME001. This work was completed and the course was posted in September 2018. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities, please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer.Team LeadRachel Brooks-Pannell                       Columbus State Community CollegeContent ContributorsCatherine Braun                                  Ohio State UniversityMartin Brick                                         Ohio Dominican UniversityPeter Landino                                      Terra State Community CollegeBrian Leingang                                    Edison State Community CollegeBonnie Proudfoot                                Hocking CollegeJason Reynolds                                  Southern State Community CollegeMarie Stokes                                       Stark State CollegeLibrarianKatie Foran-Mulcahy                           University of Cincinnati Clermont CollegeReview TeamAnna Bogen                                        Marion Technical CollegeSteven Mohr                                       Terra State Community CollegeKelsey Squire                                      Ohio Dominican University                                     

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/29/2018
First Year Writing Course Content, Collaboration, Collaboration: Course Map & Recommended Resources
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources that can be used to address the topic of Collaboration in a First-Year Writing Course. All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink.Course MapApplication of the following resources address the learning objectives above. Many of the resources have complete chapters that apply to these Collaboration objectives as a whole, with examples and exercises provided. The exercises and lessons can be used to demonstrate many of the collaborative activities accessible in a first-year writing course.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
07/11/2018
First Year Writing Course Content, Critical Thinking, Critical Thinking: Course Map & Recommended Resources
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources that can be used to address the topic of Critical Thinking in a First-Year Writing Course.  All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
07/11/2018
First Year Writing Course Content, Genres, Genres: Course Map & Recommended Resources
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Recommended ResourcesIn first-year writing, emphasis might be placed on getting students to be more critical thinkers, readers, and writers; to recognize the elements that inform rhetorical situations; to understand the importance of the writing process; and to practice the composing of formal written work in response to many sources. Second-year writing builds on the lessons learned in first-year writing, while possibly adding deeper analysis and critique through the development of arguments supported by evidence found during formal research. Given that many colleges/universities only require their students to take first-year writing, some instructors have chosen to introduce learning objectives from second-year writing to their students earlier. This overlap between the two means that a variety of genres can be taught in either course. Below are some possibilities. In no way is this list complete, but it does provide common writing assignment descriptions and examples/samples.Successful WritingThis resource is available as a PDF.Cause and EffectClassificationComparison and ContrastDefinitionDescriptionIllustrationNarrationPersuasionProcess AnalysisResearchWriting for SuccessThis is adapted from a work produced by a publisher who has requested that the original author not receive attribution. This adapted edition is produced by the University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing through the eLearning Support Initiative.Cause-and-Effect EssayClassification EssayCompare-and-Contrast EssayDefinition EssayDescriptive EssayIllustration EssayNarrative EssayPersuasive EssayProcess Analysis EssayWriting Unleashed by Sybil Priebe, Dana Anderson, and Ronda MarmanThis resource is available as a PDF and published by North Dakota State College of Science. ArgumentCause and EffectCompare and ContrastDefinitionDescriptionDivision and ClassificationEmailEssaysIllustrationLettersMemoirsNarrationProfilesProcess AnalysisResearchPurdue Online Writing LabMost students are familiar with this site due to its extensive use among English instructors.Annotated BibliographiesArgumentBook ReportsBook ReviewsDefinitionsExam EssaysExploratoryCover LettersResearch RésumésThe Process of Research Writing by Steven KrauseThis resource has Creative Commons Attribution, Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0.Annotated Bibliography

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
07/11/2018
First Year Writing Course Content, Grammar and Style
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources that can be used to address the topics of Grammar and Style in a First-Year Writing Course. This information could also be used in a Second-Year Writing Course. All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink.Introduction In this section, style and grammar are addressed in three different senses. There is a Style Guide that covers audience awareness and clear written communications. That is followed by a guide to the most common Citation Styles (APA, MLA, and CMS). Last but not least, there is an in depth Grammar Handbook that comes with exercises and checklists for perfecting mechanics and assuring strong revision and proofreading.Learning ObjectivesThis module is designed to address the following learning objectives:Be aware of intended audienceUse standard written EnglishCommunicate clearly and efficientlyOvercome barriers to clear communicationsFormat correctlyUse the appropriate citation style with sourcesAvoid grammatical and mechanical errors

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
First Year Writing Course Content, Grammar and Style, Grammar and Style: Course Map & Recommended Resources
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources that can be used to address the topics of Grammar and Style in a First-Year Writing Course. This information could also be used in a Second-Year Writing Course. All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink.Course Map  The resources included here are intended to address the aforementioned learning objective. Specific sections of each resource have been paired with subjects in this guide. That said, many of these texts could also be used in whole. A shorter text like Robin Jeffrey’s About Writing or a handbook like Saylor Academy’s Business English for Success may be all that students with a strong background in English need. In other cases, a more comprehensive text, like the University of Minnesota’s Writing for Success, may be required to properly prepare students for college writing.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
07/11/2018
First Year Writing Course Content, Media/Design
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources that can be used to address the topic of Media and Design -- reading, analyzing, and composing multimodal texts -- in a First-Year Writing Course. All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink. 

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
First Year Writing Course Content, Media/Design, Media and Design: Course Map & Recommended Resources
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The media landscape our students inhabit is rich with multimodal texts. Instructors might assume that because students are constantly consuming multimodal texts, they are adept at reading and composing them. However, that is not necessarily the case. Just as students need to be taught to critically analyze printed texts, they also need to be taught to critically analyze multimodal texts and recognize the rhetorical moves in such texts. Providing students with tools to analyze and compose a variety of texts also helps prepare them to adjust to the literacy demands of an increasingly digital communications environment, in which they will have to filter information and make sense of, assess, learn from, and compose multimodal texts.This module recommends texts that align with learning objectives focused on analyzing and composing with multimodal resources. Many of the suggested readings and activities described in the other modules of this guide can be applied to multimodal texts (e.g., analyzing multimodal texts instead of or alongside of primarily alphabetic texts). Below are additional resources and suggestions. 

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
08/13/2018
First Year Writing Course Content, Punctuation
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources available to address the resource goal of Punctuation in a First-Year Writing Course.  All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink.IntroductionThis description is intended to apply to a range of First-Year Writing courses, from highly conceptual to more traditional presentations, in regards to punctuation. It will cover definitions of the most common punctuation terms, examples of proper usage, and exercises that demonstrate proper usage. These descriptions and exercises can be incorporated regardless of the types of readings chosen for the course, the genres a course may focus on, etc. This guide is intended to work as a handbook on general punctuation rules and usage.Learning ObjectivesThis module is designed to address the following learning objectives:Explain and illustrate common comma errorsIllustrate comma usage with conjunctionsCoordinating conjunctionsConjunctive adverbsSubordinating conjunctionsIllustrate comma usage with clausesRelative clausesDependent and Independent clausesExplain and illustrate use of apostrophesExplain and illustrate use of semicolonsExplain and illustrate use of colonsExplain and illustrate use of quotationsExplain and illustrate use of hyphensExplain and illustrate use of parenthesesExplain and illustrate use of dashes

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
First Year Writing Course Content, Punctuation, Punctuation: Course Map & Recommended Resources
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CC BY-NC
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources available to address the resource goal of Punctuation in a First-Year Writing Course.  All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink.Course MapApplication of the following resources addresses the learning objectives above. Many of the resources have complete chapters that apply to these Punctuation objectives as a whole, with examples as expected in a typical handbook covering punctuation. The exercises and lessons can be used to demonstrate the application of these terms in single-sentence exercises, or in actual student writing. 

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
07/11/2018
First Year Writing Course Content, Reading in Academia
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources that can be used to address the topic of Reading in Academia in a First-Year Writing Course.  All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink.IntroductionThis portion of the course stresses college-level reading. It will focus on three areas in particular: 1) Preparedness – how college reading may differ from high school reading; 2) Reading Strategies – how to choose, evaluate, and interact with texts; 3) Reading into Writing – how to make notes, summarize, paraphrase, and use what you are reading in an ethical manner. These skills will overlap with other learning objectives (e.g. Writing in Academia, Rhetorical Situations, etc.), and instructors will likely want to use these resources and design activities in conjunction with other learning objectives. Further, this module assumes that instructors have chosen their own primary reading (essays, literature, etc.) to which the strategies outlined in these resources may be applied.Learning ObjectivesThis module is designed to address the following learning objectivesDetermine an author’s purpose in writingIdentify reasons and evidence that support an author’s argumentDistinguish between reliable and unreliable sourcesPractice effective annotation and note-taking techniquesIdentify words or phrases that suggest an author’s biasRecognize appeals to logos, pathos, and/or ethosUnderstand ethical methods of paraphrasing and summarizing a source

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
First Year Writing Course Content, Reading in Academia, Reading in Academia: Course Map & Recommended Resources
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CC BY-NC
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources that can be used to address the topic of Reading in Academia in a First-Year Writing Course.  All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink.Course MapThe resources included here are intended to address the above listed learning objectives.  They will cover three aspects of Reading in Academia: preparedness, strategies for reading, and using reading in writing ethically. Preparedness may be taught as a standalone lesson or as a group of lessons, but most other tasks would be handled in the context of meeting other learning objectives, such as Writing in Academia, Rhetorical Situations, Genres, etc.  

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/29/2018
First Year Writing Course Content, Understanding Rhetorical Situations, Understanding Rhetorical Situations: Course Map & Recommended Resources
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CC BY-NC
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources available to address the resource goal of Understanding Rhetorical Situations in a First-Year Writing Course. All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
07/11/2018
First Year Writing Course Content, Writing as a Process
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources that can be used to address the topic of Writing as a Process in a First-Year Writing Course. All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink.IntroductionThis portion of the course is intended to recommend the best open educational resources related to process writing, including identifying the steps in the writing process, understanding that the process is flexible, generating ideas for development of a topic, narrowing the topic in order to identify a thesis, drafting the essay and handling writer’s block, organizing the draft, engaging a peer review process, creating successively improved drafts, using revision and editing to improve the drafts, and assessing the effectiveness of the writing process.These skills will overlap with other learning objectives (e.g. Critical Thinking, Conducting Research, etc.), and instructors will likely want to use these resources and design activities in conjunction with other learning objectives. Further, this module assumes that instructors have chosen their own primary readings (academic journal articles, examples of student research papers) as examples to which the strategies outlined in these resources may be applied. It should be noted that the skills involved in the writing process are not only applicable to the academic writing presented in a first-year writing course, but to a broad cross section of the rhetorical patterns employed in many cultures and languages.Learning ObjectivesThis module is designed to address the following learning objectives:Identify the steps in the writing process Understand that the process is flexible Generate ideas for development of a topic Narrow the topic to identify the working thesis Create an outline Draft the essay while handling writer’s block Organize and reorganize the draft Engage the peer review process Create successively improved drafts Use revision and editing to improve drafts Create a working outline Assess the effectiveness of the writing process Revise the process as needed.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
First Year Writing Course Content, Writing as a Process, Writing as a Process: Course Map & Recommended Readings
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CC BY-NC
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources that can be used to address the topic of Writing as a Process in a First-Year Writing Course. All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded or added to a Course Management System via hyperlink.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
08/08/2018
First Year Writing Course Content, Writing in Academia, Writing in Academia: Course Map & Recommended Resources
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CC BY-NC
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How to Use This GuideThis document is intended to highlight resources that can be used to address the topic of Writing in Academia in a First-Year Writing Course. All resources are Open Access and can be downloaded to a Course Management System via hyperlink.IntroductionOften students enroll in a college-writing course with the common misconception that they will be doing more of what they did in high school English. This portion of the course is simply to introduce students to college writing, specifically how it differs from that of high school, the myths and expectations of writing for higher education, as well as types of assignments instructors may ask students to do. This module does not include many activities, for its intent is not to hone the writing skills of students. This introductory guide is intended to help students transition into new ways of approaching writing, and can be utilized regardless of the types of writing assignments chosen for the course.  

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/29/2018
Foundational Practices of Online Writing Instruction
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Foundational Practices of Online Writing Instruction, edited by Beth L. Hewett and Kevin Eric DePew, with associate editors Elif Guler and Robbin Zeff Warner, addresses the questions and decisions that administrators and instructors most need to consider when developing online writing programs and courses. Written by experts in the field (members of the Conference on College Composition and Communication Committee for Effective Practices in OWI and other experts and stakeholders), the contributors to this collection explain the foundations of the recently published (2013) A Position Statement of Principles and Examples Effective Practices for OWI and provide illustrative practical applications. To that end, in every chapter, the authors address issues of inclusive and accessible writing instruction (based upon physical and mental disability, linguistic ability, and socioeconomic challenges) in technology enhanced settings.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
WAC Clearinghouse
Author:
Beth Hewett
Kevin DePew
Date Added:
02/21/2015
The Gordon State College Writing Handbook
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Members of the Gordon faculty have collaborated on the authorship of this guide, and it is targeted directly at Gordon students to help them with their writing across the GSC curriculum. This guide provides at least three distinct advantages over other guides: it is specifically targeted to Gordon State students, it covers writing across the whole curriculum, not just English; and it is free.

Many approaches to crafting this guide were entertained, but the authors decided that what students really want from a composition guide are practical examples of writing that they might actually encounter in their classroom experiences at Gordon. Many guides try to do this, but this guide uses real Gordon professors and real Gordon class assignments as a starting point. This results in what we feel is a substantial improvement over other available writing guides.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Mark King
Wesley Venus
Date Added:
03/19/2016
A Guide to Rhetoric, Genre, and Success in First-Year Writing
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This book combines the Introduction to Writing in College by Melanie Gagich and ENG 102: Reading, Writing and Research by Emilie Zickel, which were both supported by Cleveland State University’s 2017 Textbook Affordability Small Grant. The book was then revised, edited, and formatted by Melanie Gagich, Emilie Zickel, Yvonne Bruce, Sarah Lacy, John Lanning, Amanda Lloyd, Charlotte Morgan, and Rashida Mustafa. This work was made possible through the generous support of the Cleveland State University Office of the Provost.

Within each chapter there are sections written by Melanie Gagich, Emilie Zickel, or other members of the textbook team (see above) and authorial attributions are given. This book also contains other resources integrated under Creative Commons licenses. These open access resources include complete and also remixed chapters from Monique Babin, Carol Burnell, Susan Pesznecker, Nichole Rosevear, and Jamie Wood’s The Word on College Reading and Writing, links to several essays from the open source textbook series Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing, and several links to articles from the open source website Writing Commons. Additionally, parts of this book also come out of a remixed version of Robin Jeffrey’s, About Writing, which have been rearranged, amended, edited, and enhanced with digital reading experience by including videos and visual reading features. Shared and remixed materials will be denoted with attribution information when necessary.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Cleveland State University
Author:
Emilie Zickel
Melanie Gagich
Date Added:
01/08/2021