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Ancient World History to 1300 C.E.
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This textbook is divided into three sections: Africa, Asia & Americas, and Europe. It explores the history of the world from pre-historic times to 1300 C.E., paying specific attention to the interconnections (or disconnections) between peoples and regions. Students are encouraged to think beyond their experiences with western civilizations to recognize the widespread impact of historical events and trends, including how they helped shape the world today. Touching upon each world region, the readings investigate the impact of environment, economics, politics, and religion on diverse societies. Key topics are sites of change and integration such as the rise of cities, religion, technology, migration and trade, the spread of disease, gender relationships, warfare and social movements.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Cleveland State University
Author:
Kelly Wrenhaven
Meshack Owino
Shelley Rose
Date Added:
01/08/2021
Canadian History: Post-Confederation
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This textbook introduces aspects of the history of Canada since Confederation. “Canada” in this context includes Newfoundland and all the other parts that come to be aggregated into the Dominion after 1867. Much of this text follows thematic lines. Each chapter moves chronologically but with alternative narratives in mind. What Aboriginal accounts must we place in the foreground? Which structures (economic or social) determine the range of choices available to human agents of history? What environmental questions need to be raised to gain a more complete understanding of choices made in the past and their ramifications? Each chapter is comprised of several sections and some of those are further divided. In many instances you will encounter original material that has been contributed by other university historians from across Canada who are leaders in their respective fields. They provide a diversity of voices on the subject of the nation’s history and, thus, an opportunity to experience some of the complexities of understanding and approaching the past. Canadian History: Post-Confederation includes Learning Objectives and Key Points in most chapter sections, intended to help identify issues of over-arching importance. Recent interviews with historians from across Canada have been captured in video clips that are embedded throughout the web version of the book. At the end of each chapter, the Summary section includes additional features: Key Terms, Short Answer Exercises, and Suggested Readings. The key terms are bolded in the text, and collected in a Glossary in the appendix.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Canadian History: Pre-Confederation
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Canadian History: Pre-Confederation is a survey text that introduces undergraduate students to important themes in North American history to 1867. It provides room for Aboriginal and European agendas and narratives, explores the connections between the territory that coalesces into the shape of modern Canada and the larger continent and world in which it operates, and engages with emergent issues in the field. The material is pursued in a largely chronological manner to the early 19th century, at which point social, economic, and political change are dissected. Canadian History: Pre-Confederation provides, as well, a reconnaissance of historical methodology and debates in the field, exercises for students, Key Terms and a Glossary, and section-by-section Key Points. Although this text can be modified, expanded, reduced, and reorganized to suit the needs of the instructor, it is organized so as to support learning, to broaden (and sometimes provoke) debate, and to engage students in thinking like historians. Written and reviewed by subject experts drawn from colleges and universities, this is the first open textbook on the topic of Canadian history.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
John Douglas Belshaw, Thompson Rivers University
Date Added:
04/25/2016
The History of Our Tribe: Hominini
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Where did we come from? What were our ancestors like? Why do we differ from other animals? How do scientists trace and construct our evolutionary history? The History of Our Tribe: Hominini provides answers to these questions and more. The book explores the field of paleoanthropology past and present. Beginning over 65 million years ago, Welker traces the evolution of our species, the environments and selective forces that shaped our ancestors, their physical and cultural adaptations, and the people and places involved with their discovery and study. It is designed as a textbook for a course on Human Evolution but can also serve as an introductory text for relevant sections of courses in Biological or General Anthropology or general interest. It is both a comprehensive technical reference for relevant terms, theories, methods, and species and an overview of the people, places, and discoveries that have imbued paleoanthropology with such fascination, romance, and mystery.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
State University of New York
Provider Set:
Milne Open Textbooks
Author:
Barbara Welker
Date Added:
07/10/2017
A History of Western Medicine, Disease, and Public Health, vol. 2 (since 1700)
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This textbook provides a contextualized approach to a Western civilization historical survey course, focusing on the modern history of medicine in Europe, North America, and the colonial world from 1700 to the present. The textbook emphasizes how disease classifications and medical and sanitation practices are framed within their social and cultural contexts, and how ideas about bodies, disease, disability, health, and healing have been associated historically with such factors as race and ethnicity, religion, social class and gender. Some major themes include diverse perspectives and conflicts in the progress and triumph of modern medical science and the identification of historical patterns in modern medical identities, practices, issues, and controversies.

The books seeks to develop historical awareness of major events and ideas that have shaped the evolution of Western medical and public health practices in the modern era as well ideas about disease and disability, and to enhance critical thinking and writing skills to engage in the analysis of historical and contemporary issues. A reader of primary documents corresponding to each chapter is also available.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Columbus State Community College
Author:
Boster
Pugno
Date Added:
12/30/2019
Literature, the Humanities, and Humanity
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Literature, the Humanities, and Humanity attempts to make the study of literature more than simply another school subject that students have to take. At a time when all subjects seem to be valued only for their testability, this book tries to show the value of reading and studying literature, even earlier literature. It shows students, some of whom will themselves become teachers, that literature actually has something to say to them. Furthermore, it shows that literature is meant to be enjoyed, that, as the Roman poet Horace (and his Renaissance disciple Sir Philip Sidney) said, the functions of literature are to teach and to delight. The book will also be useful to teachers who want to convey their passion for literature to their students. After an introductory chapter that offers advice on how to read (and teach) literature, the book consists of a series of chapters that examine individual literary works ranging from The Iliad to Charles Dickens’ Bleak House. These chapters can not substitute for reading the actual works. Rather they are intended to help students read those works. They are attempts to demystify the act of reading and to show that these works, whether they are nearly three thousand or less than two hundred years old, still have important things to say to contemporary readers.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
State University of New York
Provider Set:
Milne Open Textbooks
Author:
Theodore L. Steinberg
Date Added:
09/11/2014
Music: Its Language, History, and Culture
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Welcome to Music 1300, Music: Its Language History, and Culture. The course has a number of interrelated objectives:
1. To introduce you to works representative of a variety of music traditions.These include the repertoires of Western Europe from the Middle Agesthrough the present; of the United States, including art music, jazz, folk, rock, musical theater; and from at least two non-Western world areas (Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, the Middle East, Indian subcontinent).
2. To enable you to speak and write about the features of the music you study,employing vocabulary and concepts of melody, rhythm, harmony, texture, timbre,and form used by musicians.
3. To explore with you the historic, social, and cultural contexts and the role of class, ethnicity, and gender in the creation and performance of music,including practices of improvisation and the implications of oral andnotated transmission.
4. To acquaint you with the sources of musical sounds—instruments and voices fromdifferent cultures, found sounds, electronically generated sounds; basic principlesthat determine pitch and timbre.
5. To examine the influence of technology, mass media, globalization, and transnationalcurrents on the music of today.
The chapters in this reader contain definitions and explanations of musical terms and concepts,short essays on subjects related to music as a creative performing art, biographical sketchesof major figures in music, and historical and cultural background information on music fromdifferent periods and places.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Douglas Cohen
Date Added:
04/27/2020
An Outline History of East Asia to 1200
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This is the second edition of the open access textbook that arose out of a course at the University of California, San Diego, called HILD 10: East Asia: The Great Tradition. The course covers what have become two Chinas, Japan, and two Koreas from roughly 1200 BC to about AD 1200. As we say every Fall in HILD 10: “2400 years, three countries, ten weeks, no problem.” The book does not stand alone: the teacher should assign primary and secondary sources, study questions, dates to be memorized, etc. The maps mostly use the same template to enable students to compare them one to the next.

The 1st edition is in the supplemental material tab.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Sarah Schneewind
Date Added:
11/01/2021
Palabras propias
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The goal of this project is to provide high-quality, accessible primary sources to those teaching and studying the histories and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world and the indigenous peoples of Latin America. Our modules cover a wide range of topics, but all consist of the same essential parts:

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Kansas
Author:
Sean Gullickson
Date Added:
10/29/2021
Speaking of Culture
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The purpose of Speaking of Culture is to define culture and many other concepts associated with it. My hope is that the readings in this book will help you to better understand the breadth of the concept of culture and provide you with a vocabulary for discussing it more articulately.

Culture is one of those broad concepts that is used widely, although somewhat imprecisely, in everyday English. It also cuts across many academic disciplines, and this book draws on many of them. It touches, for instance, on anthropology, biology, history, mythology, political science, psychology, and sociology.

Subject:
World Cultures
Communication
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Nolan Weil
Date Added:
04/27/2020
US/American History I Course Content
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The US/American History I course was developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. This work was completed and the course was posted in September 2019. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Assurance Guides and is also named OHS043. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities, please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer.Team LeadCraig Semsel                                     Lorain County Community College   Content ContributorsSharon Deubreau                              Rhodes State CollegeRuth Dubinsky                                   Stark State CollegePeter Manos                                      Cleveland State UniversityLibrarianTim Sandusky                                   Ohio Dominican UniversityReview TeamDavid Stebenne                                Ohio State University 

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
01/09/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Age of Jackson 1820-1840, Age of Jackson 1820-1840
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One of the most notable political developments in the years before the Civil War was the rise of American democracy. Whereas the founders of the new nation envisioned the United States as a republic, not a democracy, and had placed safeguards such as the Electoral College in the 1787 Constitution to prevent simple majority rule, the early 1820s saw many Americans embracing majority rule and rejecting old forms of deference that were based on elite ideas of virtue, learning, and family lineage. A new breed of politicians learned to harness the power of the many by appealing to the resentments, fears, and passions of ordinary citizens to win elections. The charismatic Andrew Jackson gained a reputation as a fighter and defender of American expansion, emerging as the quintessential figure leading the rise of American democracy. Characteristics of modern American democracy, including the turbulent nature of majority rule, first appeared during the Age of Jackson.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, America and the Industrial Revolution 1800-1850, America and the Industrial Revolution 1800-1850
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In the early years of the nineteenth century, Americans’ endless commercial ambition—what one Baltimore paper in 1815 called an “almost universal ambition to get forward”—remade the nation. Between the Revolution and the Civil War, an old subsistence world died and a new more-commercial nation was born. [Image: William James Bennett, View of South Street, from Maiden Lane, New York City, c. 1827, via Metropolitan Museum of New York]

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, American Idealism and Reform 1820-1860, American Idealism and Reform 1820-1860
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The Antebellum Period brought about many changes to the way the people living in the United States thought about what it meant to be an American, With the Second Great Awakening and the Transcendentalist Movement the way Americans thought about being an American was changed and shaped, which began to include women and black people. The search for a perfect society in these times only helped to spur the changes across social, regional and economic parts of the American Society, which are evident in the reform movements that followed.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Colonial Societies 1500-1700, Colonial Societies 1500-1700
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 By the mid-seventeenth century, the geopolitical map of North America had become a patchwork of imperial designs and ambitions as the Spanish, Dutch, French, and English reinforced their claims to parts of the land. Uneasiness, punctuated by violent clashes, prevailed in the border zones between the Europeans’ territorial claims. Meanwhile, still-powerful native peoples waged war to drive the invaders from the continent. In the Chesapeake Bay and New England colonies, conflicts erupted as the English pushed against their native neighbors.The rise of colonial societies in the Americas brought Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans together for the first time, highlighting the radical social, cultural, and religious differences that hampered their ability to understand each other. European settlement affected every aspect of the land and its people, bringing goods, ideas, and diseases that transformed the Americas. Reciprocally, Native American practices, such as the use of tobacco, profoundly altered European habits and tastes

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Early Globalization: The Atlantic World 1492-1650, Early Globalization: The Atlantic World 1492-1650
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Introduction: The race was on!  The Spanish and Portuguese were the first to search for whatever wealth the “New” World might have, and found many “new” foodstuffs in addition to gold that changed the population of Europe. The Spanish and other Europeans shared new things with the native populations as well. Horses, metal tools, and different types of cloth were traded. Small pox, various colds, and other diseases were also exchanged, and wiped out large portions of the native populations.France, the Netherlands and England also wanted the riches the New World had to offer. Each country had its own ideas of what the Americas could provide for them, and by the end of the time period, the age of colonization had begun.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Early Republic 1790-1820, Early Republic 1790-1820
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In the nation’s first few years, no organized political parties existed. This began to change as U.S. citizens argued bitterly about the proper size and scope of the new national government. As a result, the 1790s witnessed the rise of opposing political parties: the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans. Federalists saw unchecked democracy as a dire threat to the republic, and they pointed to the excesses of the French Revolution as proof of what awaited. Democratic-Republicans opposed the Federalists’ notion that only the wellborn and well educated were able to oversee the republic; they saw it as a pathway to oppression by an aristocracy.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, English Empires 1660-1763
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The eighteenth century witnessed the birth of Great Britain (after the union of England and Scotland in 1707) and the expansion of the British Empire. By the mid-1700s, Great Britain had developed into a commercial and military powerhouse; its economic sway ranged from India, where the British East India Company had gained control over both trade and territory, to the West African coast, where British slave traders predominated, and to the British West Indies, whose lucrative sugar plantations, especially in Barbados and Jamaica, provided windfall profits for British planters. Meanwhile, the population rose dramatically in Britain’s North American colonies. In the early 1700s the population in the colonies had reached 250,000. By 1750, however, over a million British migrants and African slaves had established a near-continuous zone of settlement on the Atlantic coast from Maine to Georgia. During this period, the ties between Great Britain and the American colonies only grew stronger. Anglo-American colonists considered themselves part of the British Empire in all ways: politically, militarily, religiously (as Protestants), intellectually, and racially.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
US/American History I Course Content, English Empires 1660-1763, English Empires 1660-1763
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The eighteenth century witnessed the birth of Great Britain (after the union of England and Scotland in 1707) and the expansion of the British Empire. By the mid-1700s, Great Britain had developed into a commercial and military powerhouse; its economic sway ranged from India, where the British East India Company had gained control over both trade and territory, to the West African coast, where British slave traders predominated, and to the British West Indies, whose lucrative sugar plantations, especially in Barbados and Jamaica, provided windfall profits for British planters. Meanwhile, the population rose dramatically in Britain’s North American colonies. In the early 1700s the population in the colonies had reached 250,000. By 1750, however, over a million British migrants and African slaves had established a near-continuous zone of settlement on the Atlantic coast from Maine to Georgia. During this period, the ties between Great Britain and the American colonies only grew stronger. Anglo-American colonists considered themselves part of the British Empire in all ways: politically, militarily, religiously (as Protestants), intellectually, and racially.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Formation of Government 1776-1790, Formation of Government 1776-1790
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 While the Articles of Confederation formed a loose working political body for the colonists to wage war, its shortcomings quickly became evident. The deliberations over the new form of government, worthy of the sacrifices and meeting the lofty ideals of the Revolutionaries became another struggle to define the meaning of the Revolution.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Imperial Reforms and Colonial Protests 1763-1774, Imperial Reforms and Colonial Protests 1763-1774
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The government’s formerly lax oversight of the colonies ended as the architects of the British Empire put these new reforms in place. The British hoped to gain greater control over colonial trade and frontier settlement as well as to reduce the administrative cost of the colonies and the enormous debt left by the French and Indian War. Each step the British took, however, generated a backlash. Over time, imperial reforms pushed many colonists toward separation from the British Empire.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Manifest Destiny 1800-1860, Manifest Destiny 1800-1860
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"Although called into name in 1845, manifest destiny was a widely held but vaguely defined belief that dated back to the founding of the nation. First, many Americans believed that the strength of American values and institutions justified moral claims to hemispheric leadership. Second, the lands on the North American continent west of the Mississippi River (and later into the Caribbean) were destined for American-led political and agricultural improvement. Third, God and the Constitution ordained an irrepressible destiny to accomplish redemption and democratization throughout the world. All three of these claims pushed many Americans, whether they uttered the words manifest destiny or not, to actively seek the expansion of democracy. These beliefs and the resulting actions were often disastrous to anyone in the way of American expansion. The new religion of American democracy spread on the feet and in the wagons of those who moved west, imbued with the hope that their success would be the nation’s success." - American Yawp, Chap 12 Introduction[Image - John Gast, American Progress, 1872. Wikimedia.]

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Reconstruction 1865-1877, Reconstruction 1865-1877
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“After the Civil War, much of the South lay in ruins… The future of the South was uncertain. How would these states be brought back into the Union? Would they be conquered territories or equal states? How would they rebuild their governments, economies, and social systems? What rights did freedom confer on formerly enslaved people? The answers to many of Reconstruction’s questions hinged on the concepts of citizenship and equality. The era witnessed perhaps the most open and widespread discussions of citizenship since the nation’s founding. It was a moment of revolutionary possibility and violent backlash… Resistance continued, and Reconstruction eventually collapsed. In the South, limits on human freedom endured and would stand for nearly a century more.”-The American Yawp, Chap. 15 Introduction[Image: The Freedmen’s Bureau; Alfred Rudolph Waud; Published in Harper’s Weekly on July 25, 1868; The Historic New Orleans Collection ]

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, The Americas: Native American Societies pre-1492, The Americas, Europe and Africa before 1492
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What Europeans called “the New World” had people living there that had been there for thousands of years. Great civilizations had risen, large population centers had come and gone, and the people we know today as Native Americans or First Americans spoke many languages, had trade routes, treaties, and a variety of religions. Africa, or more specifically, West Africa, also had great kingdoms, trade routes, and a large variety of languages, religions, and traditions.  Many West Africans had already encountered European and Middle Eastern peoples through trade along the sea ports and across the Mediterranean.  As religious and social turmoil changed the European landscape, new inventions like the caravel, astrolabe and compass allowed for easier and safer sea travel.  Spain and Portugal led the search for an easier route to the Far East and discovered the New World. They were quickly followed by the French and British.  Soon the Columbian Exchange would bring changes to the New World that no one could have expected, or predicted.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/15/2019
US/American History I Course Content, The Antebellum South 1800-1860, The Antebellum South 1800-1860
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"Nine new slave states entered the Union between 1789 and 1860, rapidly expanding and transforming the South into a region of economic growth built on slave labor... By the mid-nineteenth century, southern commercial centers like New Orleans had become home to the greatest concentration of wealth in the United States. While most white southerners did not own slaves, they aspired to join the ranks of elite slaveholders, who played a key role in the politics of both the South and the nation. Meanwhile, slavery shaped the culture and society of the South, which rested on a racial ideology of white supremacy and a vision of the United States as a white man’s republic. Slaves endured the traumas of slavery by creating their own culture and using the Christian message of redemption to find hope for a world of freedom without violence." - OpenStax U.S. History, Chap. 12 Intro[Image - a panel of "Slave Market of America", A broadside published by the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1836 - Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division ]

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, The Civil War 1860-1865, The Civil War 1860-1865
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"The American Civil War, the bloodiest in the nation’s history, resulted in approximately 750,000 deaths. The war touched the life of nearly every American as military mobilization reached levels never seen before or since... The Civil War was a defining event in the history of the United States and, for the Americans thrust into it, a wrenching one." -The American Yawp, Chap. 14 Introduction[Image: 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry Color Guard - Ohio History Connection]

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019