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Activism in the US
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No Strings Attached
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The United States has a long history of activists seeking social, political, economic, and other changes to America—along with a history of other activists trying to prevent such changes. American activism covered a wide range of causes and utilized many different forms of activism. American sociopolitical activism became especially prominent during the period of societal upheaval which began during the 1950s. The African American civil rights movement led the way, soon followed by a substantial anti-war movement opposing American involvement in the Vietnam War, and later by vigorous activism involving women’s issues, gay rights, and other causes. The United States remains a land of nearly constant change, and activists play a significant role in the ongoing evolution of American democracy. It seems likely that Americans will remain enthusiastic activists in the future. This exhibition is part of the Digital Library of Georgia.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Library of Georgia
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
The American Yawp, Volume 1 (CSCC Version)
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Remix and Share
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This version of The American Yawp, Volume I is a modified version of The American Yawp, Volume I published by Stanford University Press and edited by Joseph Locke and Ben Wright. The original textbook is licensed CC-BY-SA 4.0, and this version is licensed in the same way.

In this CSCC version, the original book was modified by the addition of focus questions and key terms for each chapter. A pop-up glossary was also added. The book format was also adapted using the Kotobee authoring platform to create a web-based eBook. Additional material is adapted from Benjamin Pugno and Dea Boster, History of Western Medicine to 1700, Autumn 2017 ed. (Columbus, OH: Columbus State Community College, 2017).

The American Yawp, Volume 1 serves as the textbook for HIST 1151 American History to 1877. To take this course for credit, register at https://www.cscc.edu/.

The eBook can be viewed directly at:

https://csbooks.org/hist1151

A set of 30 primary source readings is also available to accompany this CSCC version of The American Yawp. The primary sources may be accessed at the following link:

https://ohiolink.oercommons.org/authoring/136-hist-1151-american-history-to-1877-primary-source-

Please attribute this work in the following manner:

"The American Yawp, Vol. 1" by Dea Boster, Christianna Hurford, and Jennifer Nardone, Columbus
State Community College is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 / A derivative from the original work found at http://www.americanyawp.com/.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Columbus State Community College
Author:
Christianna Hurford
Columbus State Community College
Dea Boster
Jennifer Nardone
Date Added:
08/05/2019
Creating the US Constitution
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No Strings Attached
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the creation of the US Constitution. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Kerry Dunne
Date Added:
01/20/2016
The Equal Rights Amendment
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the Equal Rights Amendment. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbot
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
US/American History I Course Content
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The US/American History I course was developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. This work was completed and the course was posted in September 2019. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Assurance Guides and is also named OHS043. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities, please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer.Team LeadCraig Semsel                                     Lorain County Community College   Content ContributorsSharon Deubreau                              Rhodes State CollegeRuth Dubinsky                                   Stark State CollegePeter Manos                                      Cleveland State UniversityLibrarianTim Sandusky                                   Ohio Dominican UniversityReview TeamDavid Stebenne                                Ohio State University 

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
01/09/2019
US/American History I Course Content, English Empires 1660-1763
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The eighteenth century witnessed the birth of Great Britain (after the union of England and Scotland in 1707) and the expansion of the British Empire. By the mid-1700s, Great Britain had developed into a commercial and military powerhouse; its economic sway ranged from India, where the British East India Company had gained control over both trade and territory, to the West African coast, where British slave traders predominated, and to the British West Indies, whose lucrative sugar plantations, especially in Barbados and Jamaica, provided windfall profits for British planters. Meanwhile, the population rose dramatically in Britain’s North American colonies. In the early 1700s the population in the colonies had reached 250,000. By 1750, however, over a million British migrants and African slaves had established a near-continuous zone of settlement on the Atlantic coast from Maine to Georgia. During this period, the ties between Great Britain and the American colonies only grew stronger. Anglo-American colonists considered themselves part of the British Empire in all ways: politically, militarily, religiously (as Protestants), intellectually, and racially.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative