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Demographic structure of society - age
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Sociology often looks at different age cohorts. A cohort is simply a group of people, but here we're looking specifically at different age groups or generations, because these people all lived through the same certain events through a certain time that affected their lives similarly.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Author:
Sydney Brown
Date Added:
02/28/2018
Environmental Justice
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Where we live in society plays a huge role in the environmental benefits and risks that we're exposed to.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Author:
Arshya Vahabzadeh
Date Added:
02/28/2018
Introduction to Sociology
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No Strings Attached
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Introduction to Sociology is intended for a one-semester introductory sociology course. Conceived of and developed by active sociology instructors, this up-to-date title and can be downloaded now by clicking on the "Get this book" button below. This online, fully editable and customizable title includes sociology theory and research; real-world applications; simplify and debate features; and learning objectives for each chapter

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Openstax College
Author:
Eric Strayer
Faye Jones
Gail Scaramuzzo
Jeff Bry
Nathan Keirns
Sally Vyain
Susan Cody-Rydezerski
Tommy Sadler
Date Added:
02/23/2015
Introduction to Sociology Course Content
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The Introduction to Sociology Course was developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. This work was completed and the course was posted in September 2018. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Module and is also named OSS021. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities, please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer.Team LeadIrene Petten                                                Columbus State Community CollegeContent Contributors Dee Malcuit                                                 Clark State Community CollegeKwaku Oboso-Mensah                               Lorain County Community CollegeAnjel Stough-Hunter                                   Ohio Dominican UniversityLibrarianSherri Saines                                              Ohio UniversityReview TeamEric Jorrey                                                 Central Ohio Technical College 

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/07/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Aging and The Elderly, Applying the sociological perspectives to aging and the elderly
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OER Text MaterialSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections: 12.3The content in section 12.3 will clearly state the assumptions of disengagement, activity, and conflict theories of aging and critically assess these three sociologicaly theories as they relate to aging.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
10/31/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Aging and The Elderly, Critique the characteristics and challenges of aging and the elderly
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OER Text MaterialSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections: 12.4This section of the chapter will describe the differences in life expectancy around the world.List the potential problems associated with the growing proportion of older individuals in poor nations.Explain the evidence for inequality in U.S. life expectancy.Sociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections: 12.5This section of the chapter describes the four biological changes associated with aging.List any three steps that individuals can try to undertake to achieve successful aging.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
10/31/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Aging and The Elderly, Discuss aging and the elderly, the impact on domestic and global societies
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OER Text MaterialSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections: 12.1-12.6The study of aging is so important and popular that it has its own name, gerontology. Social gerontology is the study of the social aspects of aging (Hooyman & Kiyak, 2011).The scholars who study aging are called gerontologists. The people they study go by several names, most commonly “older people,” “elders,” and “the elderly.” The latter term is usually reserved for those 65 or older, while “older people” and “elders” (as the headline of the opening news story illustrates) often include people in their 50s as well as those 60 or older.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
10/31/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Aging and The Elderly, Identify the global impact and future of aging and the elderly
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OER Text MaterialsSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Sections: 12.6This section will cover:Presenting a brief sociodemographic profile of the U.S. elderly.Discuss the several problems experienced by the U.S. elderly.Describe how the social attitudes of older Americans generally differ from those of younger Americans.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
11/01/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Aging and The Elderly, Identify traditions and stereotypes of aging and the elderly
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OER Text MaterialSociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World, Chapter 12: “Aging and the Elderly” The perception of aging can vary from one society to another, and it can also change over time within any given society. Gerontologists have investigated these cross-cultural and historical differences. By understanding aging in other societies and also in our past, they say, we can better understand aging in our own society. To acquaint you with “other ways of growing old” (Amoss & Harrell, 1981), we discuss briefly some of the cross-cultural and historical evidence on the perception and experience of aging.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
10/31/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Apply the structural functionalist, social conflict and symbolic interactionist perspectives to explain the meaning and purpose of culture.
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OER Text materialTheoretical Perspectives on CultureChapter 3, subsection 3.4. According to functionalists, societies need culture to exist. Cultural norms function to support the fluid operation of society, and cultural values guide people in making choices. In addition, culture exists to meet its members’ basic needs. Conflict theorists view social structure as inherently unequal, based on power differentials related to issues like class, gender, race, and age. For a conflict theorist, culture is seen as reinforcing issues of "privilege" for certain groups based upon race, sex, class, etc. Symbolic interactionism is mostly concerned with the face-to-face interactions between members of society. Interactionists see culture as being created and maintained by the ways people interact and in how individuals interpret each other’s actions.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
12/27/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Define culture
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OER Text materialWhat is Culture?Chapter 3, subsection 3.1Culture is defined as shared beliefs, values, and practices, that participants in a society must learn. Sociologically, we examine in what situation and context certain behavior is expected, and in which situations perhaps it is not. Rules are created and enforced by people who interact and share culture. Culture consists of thoughts (expectations about personal space, for example) and tangible things (bus stops, trains, and seating capacity).General Comments:Types of sanction should be clearly identifiedSymbol should be defined in more detail. It should be made clear that symbols, like the American flag, represent something else. Thus, the American flag is not just a piece of cloth; rather, it represents American pride, etc.   

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
12/27/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of culture.
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OER Text materialElements of CultureChapter 3, subsection 3.2. This learning objective is addressed variously in the chapter. For example, under elements of culture, beliefs, values, idea culture, real culture, norms, etc. are addressed. Values are defined as a culture’s standard for discerning what is good and just in society. Values are deeply embedded and critical for transmitting and teaching a culture’s beliefs. Beliefs are the tenets or convictions that people hold to be true.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
12/27/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Explain the impact of culture on human behavior and worldview
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OER Text MaterialPop Culture, Subculture, and Cultural ChangeChapter 3, subsection 3.3. Human behavior and worldview are impacted by culture and cultural changes. For example, people are influenced by both high culture and popular culture. Due to the integration of international trade and finance markets (globalization) people have adopted different cultures. Alongside the process of globalization is diffusion, or the spread of material and nonmaterial culture. While globalization refers to the integration of markets, diffusion relates to a similar process in the integration of international cultures.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
12/27/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Explain the primary forces that produce cultural change.
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OER Text materialCultural ChangeChapter 3, subsection 3.3. The concepts of innovation, discovery, and invention are used to explain cultural change. An innovation refers to an object or concept’s initial appearance in society—it is innovative because it is markedly new. There are two types of innovation: discovery and invention. Discoveries make known previously unknown but existing aspects of reality. Inventions result when something new is formed from existing objects or concepts—when things are put together in an entirely new manner.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
12/27/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Identify material and nonmaterial cultural elements and explain their relevance in society.
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OER Text materialWhat Is Culture? Chapter 3, subsection 3.1. A subsection of this section notes that culture consists of thoughts (expectations about personal space, for example) and tangible things (bus stops, trains, and seating capacity). Then material culture is defined as the objects or belongings of a group of people. Examples of material culture are given as metro passes, bus tokens, automobiles, stores, and the physical structures where people worship. Nonmaterial culture, in contrast, consists of the ideas, attitudes, and beliefs of a society. Material and nonmaterial aspects of culture are linked, and physical objects often symbolize cultural ideas. A metro pass is a material object, but it represents a form of nonmaterial culture, namely, capitalism, and the acceptance of paying for transportation. Clothing, hairstyles, and jewelry are part of material culture, but the appropriateness of wearing certain clothing for specific events reflects nonmaterial culture. It is noted that material and nonmaterial aspects of culture can vary subtly from region to region. As people travel farther afield, moving from different regions to entirely different parts of the world, certain material and nonmaterial aspects of culture become dramatically unfamiliar.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
12/27/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Deviance, Compare and contrast the different types of deviance
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OER Text materialCrime and the LawChapter 7, subsection 7.3. At this subsection various types of crimes – violent crimes, non-violent crimes, street crimes, corporate crimes, and victimless crimes – are compared and contrasted. In addition, primary and secondary deviance are compared and contrasted.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
01/29/2019