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US/American History I Course Content
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The US/American History I course was developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. This work was completed and the course was posted in September 2019. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Assurance Guides and is also named OHS043. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities, please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer.Team LeadCraig Semsel                                     Lorain County Community College   Content ContributorsSharon Deubreau                              Rhodes State CollegeRuth Dubinsky                                   Stark State CollegePeter Manos                                      Cleveland State UniversityLibrarianTim Sandusky                                   Ohio Dominican UniversityReview TeamDavid Stebenne                                Ohio State University 

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
01/09/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Age of Jackson 1820-1840, Age of Jackson 1820-1840
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One of the most notable political developments in the years before the Civil War was the rise of American democracy. Whereas the founders of the new nation envisioned the United States as a republic, not a democracy, and had placed safeguards such as the Electoral College in the 1787 Constitution to prevent simple majority rule, the early 1820s saw many Americans embracing majority rule and rejecting old forms of deference that were based on elite ideas of virtue, learning, and family lineage. A new breed of politicians learned to harness the power of the many by appealing to the resentments, fears, and passions of ordinary citizens to win elections. The charismatic Andrew Jackson gained a reputation as a fighter and defender of American expansion, emerging as the quintessential figure leading the rise of American democracy. Characteristics of modern American democracy, including the turbulent nature of majority rule, first appeared during the Age of Jackson.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, America and the Industrial Revolution 1800-1850, America and the Industrial Revolution 1800-1850
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In the early years of the nineteenth century, Americans’ endless commercial ambition—what one Baltimore paper in 1815 called an “almost universal ambition to get forward”—remade the nation. Between the Revolution and the Civil War, an old subsistence world died and a new more-commercial nation was born. [Image: William James Bennett, View of South Street, from Maiden Lane, New York City, c. 1827, via Metropolitan Museum of New York]

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, American Idealism and Reform 1820-1860, American Idealism and Reform 1820-1860
Conditions of Use:
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The Antebellum Period brought about many changes to the way the people living in the United States thought about what it meant to be an American, With the Second Great Awakening and the Transcendentalist Movement the way Americans thought about being an American was changed and shaped, which began to include women and black people. The search for a perfect society in these times only helped to spur the changes across social, regional and economic parts of the American Society, which are evident in the reform movements that followed.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Colonial Societies 1500-1700, Colonial Societies 1500-1700
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 By the mid-seventeenth century, the geopolitical map of North America had become a patchwork of imperial designs and ambitions as the Spanish, Dutch, French, and English reinforced their claims to parts of the land. Uneasiness, punctuated by violent clashes, prevailed in the border zones between the Europeans’ territorial claims. Meanwhile, still-powerful native peoples waged war to drive the invaders from the continent. In the Chesapeake Bay and New England colonies, conflicts erupted as the English pushed against their native neighbors.The rise of colonial societies in the Americas brought Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans together for the first time, highlighting the radical social, cultural, and religious differences that hampered their ability to understand each other. European settlement affected every aspect of the land and its people, bringing goods, ideas, and diseases that transformed the Americas. Reciprocally, Native American practices, such as the use of tobacco, profoundly altered European habits and tastes

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Early Globalization: The Atlantic World 1492-1650, Early Globalization: The Atlantic World 1492-1650
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Introduction: The race was on!  The Spanish and Portuguese were the first to search for whatever wealth the “New” World might have, and found many “new” foodstuffs in addition to gold that changed the population of Europe. The Spanish and other Europeans shared new things with the native populations as well. Horses, metal tools, and different types of cloth were traded. Small pox, various colds, and other diseases were also exchanged, and wiped out large portions of the native populations.France, the Netherlands and England also wanted the riches the New World had to offer. Each country had its own ideas of what the Americas could provide for them, and by the end of the time period, the age of colonization had begun.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Early Republic 1790-1820, Early Republic 1790-1820
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In the nation’s first few years, no organized political parties existed. This began to change as U.S. citizens argued bitterly about the proper size and scope of the new national government. As a result, the 1790s witnessed the rise of opposing political parties: the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans. Federalists saw unchecked democracy as a dire threat to the republic, and they pointed to the excesses of the French Revolution as proof of what awaited. Democratic-Republicans opposed the Federalists’ notion that only the wellborn and well educated were able to oversee the republic; they saw it as a pathway to oppression by an aristocracy.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, English Empires 1660-1763
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The eighteenth century witnessed the birth of Great Britain (after the union of England and Scotland in 1707) and the expansion of the British Empire. By the mid-1700s, Great Britain had developed into a commercial and military powerhouse; its economic sway ranged from India, where the British East India Company had gained control over both trade and territory, to the West African coast, where British slave traders predominated, and to the British West Indies, whose lucrative sugar plantations, especially in Barbados and Jamaica, provided windfall profits for British planters. Meanwhile, the population rose dramatically in Britain’s North American colonies. In the early 1700s the population in the colonies had reached 250,000. By 1750, however, over a million British migrants and African slaves had established a near-continuous zone of settlement on the Atlantic coast from Maine to Georgia. During this period, the ties between Great Britain and the American colonies only grew stronger. Anglo-American colonists considered themselves part of the British Empire in all ways: politically, militarily, religiously (as Protestants), intellectually, and racially.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
US/American History I Course Content, English Empires 1660-1763, English Empires 1660-1763
Conditions of Use:
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The eighteenth century witnessed the birth of Great Britain (after the union of England and Scotland in 1707) and the expansion of the British Empire. By the mid-1700s, Great Britain had developed into a commercial and military powerhouse; its economic sway ranged from India, where the British East India Company had gained control over both trade and territory, to the West African coast, where British slave traders predominated, and to the British West Indies, whose lucrative sugar plantations, especially in Barbados and Jamaica, provided windfall profits for British planters. Meanwhile, the population rose dramatically in Britain’s North American colonies. In the early 1700s the population in the colonies had reached 250,000. By 1750, however, over a million British migrants and African slaves had established a near-continuous zone of settlement on the Atlantic coast from Maine to Georgia. During this period, the ties between Great Britain and the American colonies only grew stronger. Anglo-American colonists considered themselves part of the British Empire in all ways: politically, militarily, religiously (as Protestants), intellectually, and racially.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Formation of Government 1776-1790, Formation of Government 1776-1790
Conditions of Use:
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 While the Articles of Confederation formed a loose working political body for the colonists to wage war, its shortcomings quickly became evident. The deliberations over the new form of government, worthy of the sacrifices and meeting the lofty ideals of the Revolutionaries became another struggle to define the meaning of the Revolution.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Imperial Reforms and Colonial Protests 1763-1774, Imperial Reforms and Colonial Protests 1763-1774
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The government’s formerly lax oversight of the colonies ended as the architects of the British Empire put these new reforms in place. The British hoped to gain greater control over colonial trade and frontier settlement as well as to reduce the administrative cost of the colonies and the enormous debt left by the French and Indian War. Each step the British took, however, generated a backlash. Over time, imperial reforms pushed many colonists toward separation from the British Empire.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019