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Introduction to Sociology Course Content
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The Introduction to Sociology Course was developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. This work was completed and the course was posted in September 2018. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Module and is also named OSS021. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities, please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer.Team LeadIrene Petten                                                Columbus State Community CollegeContent Contributors Dee Malcuit                                                 Clark State Community CollegeKwaku Oboso-Mensah                               Lorain County Community CollegeAnjel Stough-Hunter                                   Ohio Dominican UniversityLibrarianSherri Saines                                              Ohio UniversityReview TeamEric Jorrey                                                 Central Ohio Technical College 

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/07/2018
Introduction to Sociology Course Content, Culture, Demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of culture.
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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OER Text materialElements of CultureChapter 3, subsection 3.2. This learning objective is addressed variously in the chapter. For example, under elements of culture, beliefs, values, idea culture, real culture, norms, etc. are addressed. Values are defined as a culture’s standard for discerning what is good and just in society. Values are deeply embedded and critical for transmitting and teaching a culture’s beliefs. Beliefs are the tenets or convictions that people hold to be true.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
07/03/2018
Metaethics from a First Person Standpoint: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Metaethics from a First Person Standpoint addresses in a novel format the major topics and themes of contemporary metaethics, the study of the analysis of moral thought and judgement. Metathetics is less concerned with what practices are right or wrong than with what we mean by ‘right’ and ‘wrong.’
Looking at a wide spectrum of topics including moral language, realism and anti-realism, reasons and motives, relativism, and moral progress, this book engages students and general readers in order to enhance their understanding of morality and moral discourse as cultural practices. Catherine Wilson innovatively employs a first-person narrator to report step-by-step an individual’s reflections, beginning from a position of radical scepticism, on the possibility of objective moral knowledge. The reader is invited to follow along with this reasoning, and to challenge or agree with each major point. Incrementally, the narrator is led to certain definite conclusions about ‘oughts’ and norms in connection with self-interest, prudence, social norms, and finally morality. Scepticism is overcome, and the narrator arrives at a good understanding of how moral knowledge and moral progress are possible, though frequently long in coming.
Accessibly written, Metaethics from a First Person Standpoint presupposes no prior training in philosophy and is a must-read for philosophers, students and general readers interested in gaining a better understanding of morality as a personal philosophical quest.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Open Book Publishers
Author:
Catherine Wilson
Date Added:
04/27/2020
OpenStax Introduction to Sociology 2e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Introduction to Sociology 2e adheres to the scope and sequence of a typical, one-semester introductory sociology course. It offers comprehensive coverage of core concepts, foundational scholars, and emerging theories, which are supported by a wealth of engaging learning materials. The textbook presents detailed section reviews with rich questions, discussions that help students apply their knowledge, and features that draw learners into the discipline in meaningful ways. The second edition retains the book’s conceptual organization, aligning to most courses, and has been significantly updated to reflect the latest research and provide examples most relevant to today’s students. In order to help instructors transition to the revised version, the 2e changes are described within the preface.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
02/01/2012
OpenStax Introduction to Sociology 2e, Culture, Elements of Culture
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Understand how values and beliefs differ from norms
Explain the significance of symbols and language to a culture
Explain the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis
Discuss the role of social control within culture

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
08/21/2018
Perspectives on deviance: Differential association, labeling theory, and strain theory
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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When a norm is violated, it's referred to as deviance. And though the word, deviance, seems negative, it's not. It simply means that an individual's behaving differently from what society feels is normal behavior.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Author:
Jeffrey Walsh
Date Added:
02/28/2018
Sustaining the Commons
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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In this book you will learn about institutions–the rules and norms that guide the interactions among us. Those rules and norms can be found from traffic rules, rules in sports, regulations on when and where alcohol can be consumed, to constitutional rules that define who can become president of the United States of America. Rules and norms guide us to cooperative outcomes of so-called collective action problems. If we rely on voluntary contributions only to get anything done, this may not lead to the best results. But research also shows that coercion of people to comply to strict rules do not necessary lead to good outcomes. What combination of sticks and carrots is needed to be successful to solve collective action problems such as sustaining the commons?

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
John Anderies
Marco Janssen
Date Added:
04/27/2020