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  • OH.OSC.0004. Core.5
Biology I Course Content
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The Biology I Course was developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Assurance Guides and is also named OSC003. This work was completed and the course was posted in October 2019. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities, please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer.Team LeadCathy Sistilli                                         Eastern Gateway Community CollegeContent ContributorsLisa Aschemeier                                 Northwest State Community CollegeShaun Blevins                                     Rhodes State CollegeRachel Detraz                                     Edison State Community College                                     Sara Finch                                          Sinclair Community CollegeWendy Gagliano                                 Clark State Community College AJ Snow                                             University of Akron Wayne CollegeLibrarianAmanda Rinehart                               Ohio State UniversityReview TeamJessica Hall                                        Ohio Dominican UniversitySanhita Gupta                                    Kent State UniversityErica Mersfelder                                 Sinclair Community College

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
01/09/2019
Biology I Course Content, Cellular Respiration, Cellular Respiration Resources
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Plants and animals must take in and transform energy for use by cells.  Plants, through photosynthesis, absorb light energy and form organic molecules such as glucose.  Glucose has potential energy in the form of chemical energy stored in its bonds.  This chapter covers the metabolic pathways of cellular respiration and describes the chemical reactions that use energy in glucose and other organic molecules to form adenosine triphosphate (ATP).  ATP is the cell’s “energy currency” fueling virtually all energy requiring processes.  The chemical reactions of cellular respiration are a series of oxidation- reduction (redox) reactions that are divided into three stages: glycolysis, the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.    

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/22/2019
Biology I Course Content, Metabolism, Metabolism Resources
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The cellular processes of life require energy.  How do living organism obtain energy and how is it used?  This Chapter answers these questions by exploring forms of energy and energy transfer within and between living organisms, as well as the role of enzymes and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in chemical reactions in cells.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/22/2019
Biology I Course Content, Photosynthesis Introduction, Photosynthesis Introduction Resources
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Virtually all life on Earth depends on Photosynthesis. Photosynthesis uses energy in sunlight to form organic molecules such as glucose.  This transformation of light energy to chemical energy provides fuel for the metabolic processes in all organisms.  Photosynthesis also produces oxygen required for aerobic cellular respiration. This chapter covers light energy as part of the electromagnetic spectrum, basic structures involved in photosynthesis and the metabolic pathways of photosynthesis divided into the light-dependent reactions and the Calvin cycle.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/22/2019
Biology II Course Content
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The Biology II Course was developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Assurance Guides and is also named OSC004. This work was completed and the course was posted in October 2019. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities, please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer.Team LeadCathy Sistilli                                         Eastern Gateway Community CollegeContent ContributorsLisa Aschemeier                                 Northwest State Community CollegeShaun Blevins                                     Rhodes State CollegeRachel Detraz                                     Edison State Community College                                     Sara Finch                                          Sinclair Community CollegeWendy Gagliano                                 Clark State Community College AJ Snow                                             University of Akron Wayne CollegeLibrarianAmanda Rinehart                               Ohio State UniversityReview TeamJessica Hall                                        Ohio Dominican UniversitySanhita Gupta                                    Kent State UniversityErica Mersfelder                                 Sinclair Community College

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
01/09/2019
Biology II Course Content, Animal Nutrition and the Digestive System, Animal Nutrition and the Digestive System Resources
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All living organisms need nutrients to survive. While plants can obtain the molecules required for cellular function through the process of photosynthesis, most animals obtain their nutrients by the consumption of other organisms. At the cellular level, the biological molecules necessary for animal function are amino acids, lipid molecules, nucleotides, and simple sugars. However, the food consumed consists of protein, fat, and complex carbohydrates. Animals must convert these macromolecules into the simple molecules required for maintaining cellular functions, such as assembling new molecules, cells, and tissues. The conversion of the food consumed to the nutrients required is a multistep process involving digestion and absorption. This module will explore these ideas as well as the components of various digestive systems found in the animal kingdom.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Biology II Course Content, Conservation Biology and Biodiversity, Conservation Biology and Biodiversity Resources
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The core threats to biodiversity are human population growth and unsustainable resource use. Current significant threats to biodiversity include habitat loss, overharvesting/overexploitation, invasive species, and climate change. Conservation biology works to counteract the loss of biodiversity due to these threats. These methods include legislative framework such as the ESA and MBA, setting aside preserves, habitat restoration, and captive breeding programs. 

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Biology II Course Content, Ecosystems, Ecosystems Resources
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An ecosystem in biology is the first level of organization that includes biotic and abiotic (non-living) components.  Ecosystem types vary widely, and ecologists study their structure and dynamics through field work and computer-based modeling.  Understanding how energy flows through and materials are cycled within ecosystems.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Biology II Course Content, Osmotic Regulation and Excretion, Osmotic Regulation and Excretion Resources
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Solute concentrations across semi-permeable membranes influence the movement of water and solutes across the membrane. Osmoregulation and osmotic balance are important bodily functions, resulting in water and salt balance. Osmolarity is measured in units of milliequivalents or milliosmoles, both of which take into consideration the number of solute particles and the charge on them. Some organisms are osmoconformers in that they are isotonic with their environment. The kidneys are the main osmoregulatory organs in mammalian systems; they function to filter blood and maintain the osmolarity of body fluids. Many systems have evolved for excreting wastes that are simpler than the kidney and urinary systems of vertebrate animals. The simplest system is that of contractile vacuoles present in microorganisms. Flame cells and nephridia in worms perform excretory functions and maintain osmotic balance. Some insects have evolved Malpighian tubules to excrete wastes and maintain osmotic balance.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Biology II Course Content, Plant Form and Physiology, Plant Form and Physiology Resources
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Plants are as essential to human existence as land, water, and air. Without plants, our day-to-day lives would be impossible because without oxygen from photosynthesis, aerobic life cannot be sustained. From providing food and shelter to serving as a source of medicines, oils, perfumes, and industrial products, plants provide humans with numerous valuable resources.  When you think of plants, most of the organisms that come to mind are vascular plants. These plants have tissues that conduct food and water, and they have seeds. Seed plants are divided into gymnosperms and angiosperms. Gymnosperms include the needle-leaved conifers susch spruce, fir, and pine. Their seeds are not enclosed by a fleshy fruit. Angiosperms, also called flowering plants, constitute the majority of seed plants. They include broadleaved trees (such as maple), vegetables (such as potatoes), grasses, and plants known for the beauty of their flowers (roses and daffodils, for example).  In this module we will be exploring the different structures found within plants, the different physiological processes performed by plants, the different mechanisms of transport that occur within plants, and various response mechanisms used by plants.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Biology II Course Content, Plant Reproduction, Plant Reproduction
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Plants have evolved different reproductive strategies for the continuation of their species. Some plants reproduce sexually, and others asexually, in contrast to animal species, which rely almost exclusively on sexual reproduction. Plant sexual reproduction usually depends on pollinating agents, while asexual reproduction is independent of these agents. Flowers are often the showiest or most strongly scented part of plants. With their bright colors, fragrances, and interesting shapes and sizes, flowers attract insects, birds, and animals to serve their pollination needs. Other plants pollinate via wind or water; still others self-pollinate. This module will explore these ideas as well as their impacts on human ventures such as agriculture and horticulture.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Biology II Course Content, Sensory Systems, Sensory Systems Resources
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In more advanced animals, the senses are constantly at work, making the animal aware of stimuli—such as light, or sound, or the presence of a chemical substance in the external environment—and monitoring information about the organism’s internal environment. All bilaterally symmetric animals have a sensory system, and the development of any species’ sensory system has been driven by natural selection; thus, sensory systems differ among species according to the demands of their environments. The shark, unlike most fish predators, is electrosensitive—that is, sensitive to electrical fields produced by other animals in its environment. While it is helpful to this underwater predator, electrosensitivity is a sense not found in most land animals.  In this chapter we will be exploring the different sensory systems found in animals.  

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Biology II Course Content, Soil and Plant Nutrition, Soil and Plant Nutrition Resources
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Cucurbitaceae is a family of plants first cultivated in Mesoamerica, although several species are native to North America. The family includes many edible species, such as squash and pumpkin, as well as inedible gourds. In order to grow and develop into mature, fruit-bearing plants, many requirements must be met, and events must be coordinated. Seeds must germinate under the right conditions in the soil; therefore, temperature, moisture, and soil quality are important factors that play a role in germination and seedling development. Soil quality and climate are significant to plant distribution and growth. The young seedling will eventually grow into a mature plant, and the roots will absorb nutrients and water from the soil. At the same time, the aboveground parts of the plant will absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and use energy from sunlight to produce organic compounds through photosynthesis. This module will explore the complex dynamics between plants and soils, and the adaptations that plants have evolved to make better use of nutritional resources.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Biology II Course Content, The Animal Body: Basic Form and Function, The Animal Body: Basic Form and Function Resources
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The arctic fox is an example of a complex animal that has adapted to its environment and illustrates the relationships between an animal’s form and function. The structures of animals consist of primary tissues that make up more complex organs and organ systems. Homeostasis allows an animal to maintain a balance between its internal and external environments.  This chapter will explore theses ideas as well as many more.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Biology II Course Content, The Endocrine System, The Endocrine System Resources
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An animal’s endocrine system controls body processes through the production, secretion, and regulation of hormones, which serve as chemical “messengers” functioning in cellular and organ activity and, ultimately, maintaining the body’s homeostasis. The endocrine system plays a role in growth, metabolism, and sexual development.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/23/2019
Biology II Course Content, The Nervous System, The Nervous System Resources
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A nervous system is an organism’s control center. It processes sensory information from outside and inside the body and controls all behaviors, from fundamental to complex. Although nervous systems throughout the animal kingdom vary in structure and complexity, each functions to maintain homeostasis.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
05/23/2019