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The American Yawp
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The American Yawp constructs a coherent and accessible narrative from all the best of recent historical scholarship. Without losing sight of politics and power, it incorporates transnational perspectives, integrates diverse voices, recovers narratives of resistance, and explores the complex process of cultural creation. It looks for America in crowded slave cabins, bustling markets, congested tenements, and marbled halls. It navigates between maternity wards, prisons, streets, bars, and boardrooms. Whitman’s America, like ours, cut across the narrow boundaries that strangle many narratives. Balancing academic rigor with popular readability, The American Yawp offers a multi-layered, democratic alternative to the American past.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The American Yawp
Date Added:
04/27/2020
The American Yawp Vol. II: Since 1877
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In an increasingly digital world in which pedagogical trends are de-emphasizing rote learning and professors are increasingly turning toward active-learning exercises, scholars are fleeing traditional textbooks. Yet for those that still yearn for the safe tether of a synthetic text, as either narrative backbone or occasional reference material, The American Yawp offers a free and online, collaboratively built, open American history textbook designed for college-level history courses. Unchecked by profit motives or business models, and free from for-profit educational organizations, The American Yawp is by scholars, for scholars. All contributors—experienced college-level instructors—volunteer their expertise to help democratize the American past for twenty-first century classrooms.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Stanford University
Author:
Ben Wright
Joseph L. Locke
Date Added:
11/08/2021
The American Yawp, Volume 1 (CSCC Version)
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This version of The American Yawp, Volume I is a modified version of The American Yawp, Volume I published by Stanford University Press and edited by Joseph Locke and Ben Wright. The original textbook is licensed CC-BY-SA 4.0, and this version is licensed in the same way.

In this CSCC version, the original book was modified by the addition of focus questions and key terms for each chapter. A pop-up glossary was also added. The book format was also adapted using the Kotobee authoring platform to create a web-based eBook. Additional material is adapted from Benjamin Pugno and Dea Boster, History of Western Medicine to 1700, Autumn 2017 ed. (Columbus, OH: Columbus State Community College, 2017).

The American Yawp, Volume 1 serves as the textbook for HIST 1151 American History to 1877. To take this course for credit, register at https://www.cscc.edu/.

The eBook can be viewed directly at:

https://csbooks.org/hist1151

A set of 30 primary source readings is also available to accompany this CSCC version of The American Yawp. The primary sources may be accessed at the following link:

https://ohiolink.oercommons.org/authoring/136-hist-1151-american-history-to-1877-primary-source-

Please attribute this work in the following manner:

"The American Yawp, Vol. 1" by Dea Boster, Christianna Hurford, and Jennifer Nardone, Columbus
State Community College is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 / A derivative from the original work found at http://www.americanyawp.com/.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Columbus State Community College
Author:
Christianna Hurford
Columbus State Community College
Dea Boster
Jennifer Nardone
Date Added:
08/05/2019
Creating the US Constitution
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the creation of the US Constitution. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Kerry Dunne
Date Added:
01/20/2016
The Equal Rights Amendment
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the Equal Rights Amendment. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbot
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
History in the Making: A History of the People of the United States of America to 1877
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This textbook examines U.S. History from before European Contact through Reconstruction, while focusing on the people and their history. Prior to its publication, History in the Making underwent a rigorous double blind peer review, a process that involved over thirty scholars who reviewed the materially carefully, objectively, and candidly in order to ensure not only its scholarly integrity but also its high standard of quality. This book provides a strong emphasis on critical thinking about US History by providing several key features in each chapter. Learning Objectives at the beginning of each chapter help students to understand what they will learn in each chapter. Before You Move On sections at the end of each main section are designed to encourage students to reflect on important concepts and test their knowledge as they read. In addition, each chapter includes Critical Thinking Exercises that ask the student to deeply explore chapter content, Key Terms, and a Chronology of events.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Catherine Locks
Marie Lasseter
Pamela Roseman
Sarah Mergel
Tamara Spike
Date Added:
09/22/2013
Oregon’s History: People of the Northwest in the Land of Eden
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This “open textbook” is a social and cultural history of the people of Oregon representing powerful figures from the dominant Euro-American culture, the marginalized and oppressed, and social and political reformers who shaped the historical legacy of the state. It is a story of the diverse array of immigrants who helped build the state and strengthen it. The title is a recollection of the racial fantasies that European-American settlers created in their expansionist vision of the West and the state of Oregon. Initially the Oregon Territory was built on intolerance and racial exclusivity, but eventually Oregon embraces its diversity, but not without struggle and heartache. Our journey through the past starts with an essential question, “Who are the people of Oregon?”

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
OpenOregon
Author:
Athanasios Michaels
Date Added:
11/03/2021
Slavery to Liberation: The African American Experience
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Slavery to Liberation: The African American Experience gives instructors, students, and general readers a comprehensive and up-to-date account of African Americans’ cultural and political history, economic development, artistic expressiveness, and religious and philosophical worldviews in a critical framework. It offers sound interdisciplinary analysis of selected historical and contemporary issues surrounding the origins and manifestations of White supremacy in the United States. By placing race at the center of the work, the book offers significant lessons for understanding the institutional marginalization of Blacks in contemporary America and their historical resistance and perseverance.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Eastern Kentucky University
Author:
Gwendolyn Graham
Joshua Farrington
Norman W. Powell
Date Added:
11/03/2021
US/American History I Course Content
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The US/American History I course was developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. This work was completed and the course was posted in September 2019. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Assurance Guides and is also named OHS043. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities, please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer.Team LeadCraig Semsel                                     Lorain County Community College   Content ContributorsSharon Deubreau                              Rhodes State CollegeRuth Dubinsky                                   Stark State CollegePeter Manos                                      Cleveland State UniversityLibrarianTim Sandusky                                   Ohio Dominican UniversityReview TeamDavid Stebenne                                Ohio State University 

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
01/09/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Age of Jackson 1820-1840, Age of Jackson 1820-1840
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One of the most notable political developments in the years before the Civil War was the rise of American democracy. Whereas the founders of the new nation envisioned the United States as a republic, not a democracy, and had placed safeguards such as the Electoral College in the 1787 Constitution to prevent simple majority rule, the early 1820s saw many Americans embracing majority rule and rejecting old forms of deference that were based on elite ideas of virtue, learning, and family lineage. A new breed of politicians learned to harness the power of the many by appealing to the resentments, fears, and passions of ordinary citizens to win elections. The charismatic Andrew Jackson gained a reputation as a fighter and defender of American expansion, emerging as the quintessential figure leading the rise of American democracy. Characteristics of modern American democracy, including the turbulent nature of majority rule, first appeared during the Age of Jackson.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, America and the Industrial Revolution 1800-1850, America and the Industrial Revolution 1800-1850
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In the early years of the nineteenth century, Americans’ endless commercial ambition—what one Baltimore paper in 1815 called an “almost universal ambition to get forward”—remade the nation. Between the Revolution and the Civil War, an old subsistence world died and a new more-commercial nation was born. [Image: William James Bennett, View of South Street, from Maiden Lane, New York City, c. 1827, via Metropolitan Museum of New York]

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, American Idealism and Reform 1820-1860, American Idealism and Reform 1820-1860
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The Antebellum Period brought about many changes to the way the people living in the United States thought about what it meant to be an American, With the Second Great Awakening and the Transcendentalist Movement the way Americans thought about being an American was changed and shaped, which began to include women and black people. The search for a perfect society in these times only helped to spur the changes across social, regional and economic parts of the American Society, which are evident in the reform movements that followed.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019
US/American History I Course Content, Colonial Societies 1500-1700, Colonial Societies 1500-1700
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 By the mid-seventeenth century, the geopolitical map of North America had become a patchwork of imperial designs and ambitions as the Spanish, Dutch, French, and English reinforced their claims to parts of the land. Uneasiness, punctuated by violent clashes, prevailed in the border zones between the Europeans’ territorial claims. Meanwhile, still-powerful native peoples waged war to drive the invaders from the continent. In the Chesapeake Bay and New England colonies, conflicts erupted as the English pushed against their native neighbors.The rise of colonial societies in the Americas brought Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans together for the first time, highlighting the radical social, cultural, and religious differences that hampered their ability to understand each other. European settlement affected every aspect of the land and its people, bringing goods, ideas, and diseases that transformed the Americas. Reciprocally, Native American practices, such as the use of tobacco, profoundly altered European habits and tastes

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Ohio Open Ed Collaborative
Date Added:
06/10/2019